Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Pay Down Your Library Fines and Help Those in Need


If you feel bad about turning in a book a few days late, here’s a great way to ease your guilty conscience. Ashe County Public Library will once again be having its Food for Fines program during the week of November 5 – 10, 2018.   Now is the time to plan for this event and make a difference in the lives of those less fortunate.  


According to the US Economic Research Center, nearly 16% of households in North Carolina are experiencing food insecurity. In Ashe County this percentage commutes to 3,940 residents (1,420 children).  The harsh reality is that many times choices must be made between buying food and paying utilities, seeking medical care, paying for housing, transportation, or education.  Many food insecure residents do not qualify for Food Nutrition Services assistance, and resort to purchasing the cheapest food available to get quantity, even when they know it may not be the healthiest option.  A host of studies reinforce the importance of good nutrition early in life for brain development, learning and even success over a lifetime.

Giving patrons the ability to reduce their fines, while at the same time helping those in need in our community is one of Ashe Library’s favorite traditions.  This year food will be collected for Ashe County’s Homeless Coalition to be distributed at a special event during the holiday season. There's no limit on the amount of cans that you can donate!  For example, 5 cans = $5 off of your library card fines.  Canned goods must be unopened and unexpired to qualify. No glass containers, please.  If you wish to participate, please bring your donations to the library circulation desk. This program only applies to overdue fines, and cannot be used to wipe out bills for lost or damaged library items.

Support healthy eating by donating the following most needed items:
·         Canned Proteins: canned tuna, salmon, chicken, peanut butter, or beans
·         Canned Vegetables: low sodium, no salt added
·         Fruits and Juices: in light syrup or its own juices, fruit cocktail, apple sauce, juice boxes
·         Pasta & Rice: brown & white rice, macaroni & cheese, pasta
·         Breakfast: cereal, oatmeal, quick oats, granola/cereal bars
·         Soups & Stews: low sodium, beef stew, chili, chicken noodle, vegetable, turkey & rice

We’ll be delighted to see as many people as possible paying off their fines with food donations.
Dates to remember in October:
 Children’s Programs
·         Baby Bounce meets every Friday at 10:30 a.m. for ages birth to 2 years.  Enjoy stories, rhymes, bounces, and songs with a stay-and-play social time afterwards. 
·         Tot Time takes place at 10:30 a.m. on Wednesdays for ages 2 and 3.  Wiggle, giggle, laugh, sing, and create.  A fun-filled time featuring stories, music, and a craft.
·         Storytime for ages 4 and 5 is at 10:30 a.m. every Thursday.  Join us for ABC adventures with stories, art, and music. 
·         The Illustrator Book Club, for grades 3 – 6, meets at 4:00 p.m. on October 11. Observe an artistic style and attempt to re-create it.
·         The Lego Club meets on October 16 at 4:00 p.m. for grades K-5. Build, Create, and make new friends.

Tween Programs
  • Join the Tween Crafty Group, grades 3 – 6, and make Halloween masks at 4:00 on October 18.
Teen Programs
·      T for Teen – Gamers Unite! Meet-up at 4:00 p.m. on October 2. Xbox360 and laptops available for teen gaming.
·      Board Game Café is open at 4:00 p.m. on October 9.  Come and make some friends! Play a variety of board games and enjoy coffee and sweet treats.
·      The Teen Creative Corner meets at 4:00 p.m. on October 16. Join us for a wide range of creative crafts and projects.
·      TLC (Teen Listening Council) is a safe place for teens to talk openly about any subject. Drop in at 4:00 p.m. on October 23.
Adult Programs
·         For all your tech troubles, book and appointment with our friendly reference librarians.  Call 336.846.2041 x227.  
·         Yoga Club meets in the library’s downstairs meeting room at 5:30 p.m. on Mondays.
·         Vickie’s Book Club meets at 1:00 p.m. on October 16 to discuss Killers of the Flower Moon by, David Grann.
  • Brouhaha Book Club meets at 5:30 p.m. on October 29 in Boondocks Restaurant for “Books, Beer and Bookworm Babble.”  Come and find out what everyone has been reading lately!
All Ages
  • Board Game Bonanza happens on Saturdays between 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. Come to the Upper Level and play board games with friends and family!
·         Read & Craft meets at 10 a.m.  on October 20. Travel the world with a hook in one hand and a ball of yarn in the other. This month, go to Japan.  Instruction available for beginners and project materials are provided.
·         The Community Drum Circle meets at 5:30 p.m. on October 11 and 25.  Join the celebration of drums, while exploring the soul and spirit of music!
·         Mountain Music Slow Jam will meet from 3:00-5:00 p.m. on October 6 and 20 in the downstairs meeting room. Songs are explained as to timing, breaks, etc… and played in slow time.  Designed for beginners, all skill levels are welcome.
·         Harry Potter Fandom takes place between 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. on October 27.  All ages are invited to dress as your favorite character, enjoy wizarding snacks, rock your profile in the “Have you seen this wizard?” photo booth, and more!
·         The Great American Boo takes place from 3:00 – 6:00 p.m. on October 31.  Visit the library where characters from PBS’s Great American Read will be giving away treats.

PBS’S THE GREAT AMERICAN READ
Cast your vote for the Great ARL Read in person or online at www.arlibrary.org/ashe and be entered to win one of three great prizes!  Vote of the Great American Read at https://www.pbs.org/the-great-american-read/vote/ and watch the series on your local PBS television station, Tuesdays at 8:00 p.m.
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Donations to the library were given in memory of Diane Goss: by Michael and Beth James, Peggy Taylor, Linda Taylor & James McNeely, Hal & Cheryl Monsees, and High Country Realty.  A donation was given to the library in memory of Kathy Metuszak by, Keith Von Qualen

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Literary Birthday Book Reviews for September


Michael Ondaatje’s birthday, September 12, 1943, inspired this month’s recommended read The English Patient.  His book won the Man Booker Prize in 1992, awarded each year for the best novel originally written in English and published in the UK in the year of the prize, regardless of the nationality of their author.  In an interview with The Guardian, he says of himself and his work, "I am a mongrel of place. Of race. Of cultures. Of many genres."  I have to agree with that statement when examining this story.  It's like Ondaatje has included a taste of himself in all the characters and setting of The English Patient.   Born in Sri Lanka, the author migrated to England when young boy and grew up to study in, and become a citizen of, Canada.  He made his name as a distinguished poet before establishing fame with this novel.    
  
                                                                 
Ondaatje writes a beautiful book, lyrical and sensual, not just a romantic tragedy, but a mystery as well. This is a post-World War II story, taking place at an abandoned villa in Italy, and involves a quartet of characters, each damaged in their own way. The mystery revolves around the identity of a burn victim, referred to as the English patient.  This patient ‘fell from the sky’ when his plane crashed in the desert.  Hana, a war nurse, has seen much suffering and senseless loss of life. She is exhausted and won't evacuate with others in her unit.  She is dedicated to caring for the English patient and knows that he is too weak to survive an exodus.   After the troops leave Hana behind, she is left to make do with what is on hand, scavenging the garden for edibles and passing time reading to her patient from books found in villa’s war-torn library. 

Caravaggio is an intricate character, a Canadian thief working for British intelligence.  He has arrived at the villa in search of Hana after hearing she stayed behind.  She is the daughter of a comrade in arms, and sometimes I felt that their familiar connection would lead to romance. He is physically and emotionally damaged, sharing a morphine addiction with the patient.  His physical pain is a result of having his thumbs cut off while being interrogated by Italians in Florence.      

Cities throughout Italy were heavily bombed during this war. Many bombs fell from planes unexploded and others were deliberately planted, so there is a section of the story that goes into depth about bombs.  The last central character, Kip, is a sapper (combat engineer) in the Indian Army assigned to the area.  He has the special skill of defusing bombs.  Hana is attracted to Kip and their relationship seems out of desperation.  Living in this booby-trapped setting, Kip’s nerves are on edge and Hana is resigned to potential dangers.  She feels most at peace with Kip, but careless about their precarious surroundings, leaving Kip to worry for the both of them.

The mystery unravels as the patient under influence of pain-easing morphine begins to talk about his past and what lead up to that fateful plane crash.  Caravaggio begins to put the bits and pieces together, the more he talks, to confirm the patient’s identity.  His name is Almasy and he is a desert cartographer working on the side of the Germans.  Almasy’s story brings deceased characters Katharine and Geoffrey Clifton into the picture.  These three were connected by love in a fatal triangle... beautiful, but sad. 

You may remember this story’s movie, nominated for seven Academy Awards in 1996.  My book club watched this at West Jefferson’s Blue Ridge Movie Lounge early one Saturday morning while snacking on plums, scones and authentic English tea (made with sweetened condensed milk).  The movie is just as beautiful as Ondaatje’s writing and comes with high recommendation.  The cast of characters include; Ralph Fiennes as the English Patient, Juliette Binoche as Hana, Willem Dafoe as Caravaggio, Kristin Scott Thomas as Katharine Clifton, Naveen Andrews as Kip, and Colin Firth as Geoffrey Clifton. 

In conversation following the film we discussed its beautiful scenery and nostalgia of that time period.  When reflecting on the book it was mentioned that these characters all seemed to move in and out of memories and at times motives for their actions were vague and ambiguous.   I think this is in part due to the book’s stylistic appeal and its expressive language … making emotions meaningful.   In portraying each character’s disjointed mental state we felt Ondaatje mastered the “shell-shocked” existence quite well. Leaving those who survived with feelings of guilt and wondering how they managed to live through it all. 

Here are some favorite quotes to show Ondaatje's way with words, “For echo is the soul of the voice exciting itself in hollow places,” and “a novel is a mirror walking down the road.”    From an online biography  Ondaatje is “deemed as a literary genius, he is one of Canada's most important contemporary writers and a prominent figure in the world of literature.” 

** If anyone is interested in next month's read and /or attending a viewing of the book’s film … please contact Smoore@arlibrary.org for details.   In keeping the book a surprise for readers of this column, I offer one hint: The movie stars Orson Wells and is a crime noir genre, with a great soundtrack

Paul Goble, born September 27, 1933, is author and illustrator of over 40 children’s books about Native Americans.  He was born and raised in Oxford, England and as a child when his mother made him a tipi and fringed leggings he developed a fascination with this culture.  As an adult, he moved to Black Hills, South Dakota to learn all he could from the Native Americans. In 1959, he was ‘adopted’ by Chief Edgar Red Cloud and given the Indian name Wakinyan Chikala, “Little Thunder.” 

It is known that in the Navajo Nation; northeastern Arizona, southeastern Utah, and northwestern New Mexico there are herds of wild horses. In this book, Paul Goble retells the legend of how this nation acquired horses, or became “horse people.” The book’s central character is a tribal girl that loves wild horses. She is drawn to these horses and spends most of her days riding among them, even sleeping in the meadows with them while they graze. When caught in a storm, she rides through canyons at night with a frightened herd and soon discovers she is lost.  A spotted stallion calms her and she becomes a member of the “horse family.”  While she is living among the horses on the plains, her tribal family wonders where she is and misses her dearly.  One day she is seen riding the spotted stallion in a group of wild horses and she is rescued or rather ‘taken’ back home.  Although glad to see her parents again, she is very sad to be away from the horses that she now feels so attached to.   She tells her people that she will return to the horses and promises to give them a colt each year.   As the story ends readers are introduced to a new beautiful black mare that is obviously the girl. Having loved the horses so much, she becomes one herself.  Although it is never mentioned that this mare was once the Indian girl, one can gather that is what happens to her in the end. 

Also in the end of the story are several Navajo songs about horses.  In looking them up online I discovered authentic recordings of Navajo Horse Riding Songs.  This hypnotic music seems to bridge the gap between humans and animals to touch the souls of both.

Reflecting on his childhood in an interview with Wisdom Tales Press, Paul says, “I loved nature and would often walk to the lake at the end of our garden. I enjoyed the trees, flowers, birds, and insects. I spent much of my time in search of wild flowers for my pressed-flower collection, and watching birds. I drew and painted birds and butterflies from books in our home, and from things I saw in museums.”

The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses was awarded a Caldecott Medal in 1979.  The Caldecott Medal was named in honor of nineteenth-century English illustrator Randolph Caldecott.  It is awarded annually by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association, to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children.  Goble uses pen and watercolors to illustrate his books.  Joe Medicine Crow, Crow Tribal Historian, and oldest living member of the Crow Tribe describes Goble’s work, “His art is tremendous because he is able to recreate the traditional forms with great accuracy and detail.  The designs he draws are completely authentic and his colors are the same ones that were used by the old-timers before the reservation days.  He is able to recreate the spirit of the old stories with his illustrations and his words.”

When I review children’s books, I like to get a child’s opinion.  I read this award-winning picture book with Elizabeth Moseley, a young illustrator of her own stories.  Elizabeth has just begun kindergarten and already has notebooks full of drawings that feature animals, people, flowers, trees, and even dinosaurs. While reading about the wild horses, we discovered all sorts of other animals hidden in the scenery … lizards, prairie dogs, rabbits, badgers, and elk.  Elizabeth noticed the buffalo and recalled seeing buffalo out in a pasture along Hwy 221.There were flowers, birds, butterflies, lightening, and rainbows. Goble’s pictures engage adults and young readers in conversation surrounding the story, and for Elizabeth new vocabulary was also discovered. Children grow up knowing about horses, but maybe not hearing the words stallion, mare, or colt.  I recommend this book for its cultural and artistic expression, but most of all for opening the door to your imagination.

‘Spotted Stallions’ by Elizabeth Moseley and Paul Goble

Monday, August 27, 2018

A New Story Walk in Town


Imagine you are taking a walk through a park and you come upon a page from a children’s picture book, displayed on a post in the ground.  As you walk along the path, you discover another page, and then another, and you realize you’re reading a story!  



StoryWalks combine three critical elements for overall family health: early literacy learning, family engagement outdoors, and physical activity. Early literacy is “what children know about reading and writing before they actually learn to read or write.” Early literacy builds the foundation for “mature” literacy (learning about all print forms of language and using them to communicate). Reading a StoryWalk with adults gives children the opportunity to learn new words, describe things and events, enjoy and tell stories, learn how to follow a story in sequence (physically moving from page to page), and hear and play with sounds and letters in words.  A StoryWalk is a perfect opportunity for parents and other adults to be their children’s first teacher while reading and playing outdoors. After experiencing a StoryWalk, families can borrow the book from the library to read it at home and extend the learning and the memory.  Physical activity is an essential component of a healthy lifestyle and must begin in infancy and extend throughout adulthood. Families should emphasize physical activity early in a child’s life because as children mature, modern culture provides many temptations to adopt a sedentary lifestyle.

Ashe County Public Library already sponsors one StoryWalk at Ashe County Park.  This new StoryWalk will be located behind the library at the West Jefferson Town Park.  Kick-off for the new StoryWalk will take place at 10:30 a.m. on August 6.  To coincide with the library’s yearly series of ‘Alphabet Ready by Five’ story times, this StoryWalk’s first featured book will be Superhero ABC by Bob McLeod.  Children can learn the alphabet from A – Z with mighty superheroes!  Arly the library fox will be on the scene for this special event and special healthy snacks will be served.  Visit the library’s StoryWalks to discover new stories and enjoy the pleasures of reading wonderful children’s books aloud with the benefit of walking together outdoors.

The library’s new StoryWalk is made possible by funding from Friends of Ashe County Library, Ida C. Marsh funds, and a Ribbon of Hope Grant. The Ribbon of Hope grant is a one-time $25,000 grant for non-profit projects furthering science, health, or education, awarded by the North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Foundation.  GSK Foundation is an independent self-funding 501(c)3 nonprofit organization supporting activities that help meet the educational and health needs of today's society and future generations.  Special thanks to the Town of West Jefferson for hosting the site for our new StoryWalk!

Dates to remember in September:
The library will be CLOSED on September 3 for Labor Day.  Call to Action: a request will be made to aldermen for assistance with funding the library’s parking expansion project on September 4, at 6:00 p.m. in West Jefferson Town Hall.  Please consider attending this meeting to show support.   

 Children’s Programs
·         Baby Bounce meets every Friday at 10:30 a.m. for ages birth to 2 years.  Enjoy stories, rhymes, bounces, and songs with a stay-and-play social time afterwards. 
·         Tot Time takes place at 10:30 a.m. on Wednesdays for ages 2 and 3.  Wiggle, giggle, laugh, sing, and create.  A fun-filled time featuring stories, music, and a craft.
·         Storytime for ages 4 and 5 is at 10:30 a.m. every Thursday.  Join us for ABC adventures with stories, art, and music. 
·         The Lego Club meets on September 18 at 4:00 p.m. for grades K-5. Build, Create, and make new friends.
·         The Illustrator Book Club, for grades 3 – 6, meets at 4:00 p.m. on September 27. Observe an artistic style and attempt to re-create it.

Tween Programs
  • The Harry Potter Escape Room will uncover the mysteries of Hogwarts; every wizard’s favorite school! Come with friends and beat the clock while solving riddles at 3:30 p.m. on September 20.
  • The ‘Design a Book Cover’ contest is taking entries until September 30.  Contest is open to sixth graders, one entry per child. Please check our webpage or call 336.846.2041 for details.
  • Find the TWEEN FALL SURVEY at www.arlibrary.org and help the library plan programs for you!
Teen Programs
·      T for Teen – Gamers Unite! Meet-up at 4:00 p.m. on September 4. Xbox360 and laptops available for teen gaming.
·      Board Game Café is open at 4:00 p.m. on September 11.  Come and make some friends! Play a variety of board games and enjoy coffee and sweet treats.
·      The Teen Creative Corner meets at 4:00 p.m. on September 18. Join us for a wide range of creative crafts and projects.
·      TLC (Teen Listening Council) is a safe place for teens to talk openly about any subject. Drop in at 4:00 p.m. on September 25.
Adult Programs
·         For all your tech troubles, book and appointment with our friendly reference librarians.  Call 336.846.2041 x227.   
·         Yoga Club meets in the library’s downstairs meeting room at 5:30 p.m. on Mondays.
·         Drop in for support on your PhD (Projects half-Done) at 10:00 a.m. on September 1.  Find new ways to stay motivated to achieve your goals throughout the year.
  • Brouhaha Book Club meets at 5:30 p.m. on September 24 in Boondocks Restaurant for “Books, Beer and Bookworm Babble.”  Come and find out what everyone has been reading lately!
  • National Voter Registration Day (all day) is on September 25.  Make sure you’re ready to cast your vote in local and national elections!  Stop by the library and register to vote, or check your voter registration status.
  • On the Same Page Literary Festival, running from September 10 – 15 features nine authors, including the United States Poet Laureate, Tracy K. Smith.  For more information, including a full schedule of events, please visit the library’s website or http://www.onthesamepagefestival.org/
All Ages
  • Board Game Bonanza happens on Saturdays between 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. Come to the Upper Level and play board games with friends and family!
  • Read & Craft meets at 10 a.m.  on September 15. Travel the world with a hook in one hand and a ball of yarn in the other. This month, go to England.  Instruction available for beginners and project materials are provided.
  • The Community Drum Circle meets at 5:30 p.m. on September 13 and 27.  Join the celebration of drums, while exploring the soul and spirit of music!
  •  Mountain Music Slow Jam will meet from 3:00-5:00 p.m. on September 1 in the downstairs meeting room. Songs are explained as to timing, breaks, etc… and played in slow time.  Designed for beginners, all skill levels are welcome.  On September 15, the slow jam group, Molasses Jam, will be performing at 3:00 p.m. during the Forest Ridge Fall Festival (located at 151 Village Park Drive, West Jefferson) 

PBS’S THE GREAT AMERICAN READ
Participate locally to earn chances to win prizes.

Vote: Cast your vote for The Great ARL Read in person or online at www.arlibrary.org/ashe

Review: Write and submit a review of one of the Top 100 books.

Attend: Attend The Great American Read events this summer and fall.

Write: Sign up to be a literary pen pal and write a letter to a fellow bookworm.

Donations to the library were given in memory of Pat Hartman by Vernon Hartman and in memory of Diane Goss: by James & Shirley Vannoy, Charles & Marlyn Hartzog, Myron & Lindy Hart, and Anthony & Ana Standish.

Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Literary Birthday Book Reviews for August


Paulo Coelho, Brazilian lyricist and novelist, was born on August 24, 1947.  His novel Veronika Decides to Die is highlighted as the Literary Birthday Book Review for AugustThis sounds like a grim story based on the title alone, but it is actually a story of redemption.  What begins with a depressing start, ends with a joyful ending. 


Once I became attached to the character, Veronika, I had hope with every page that her situation would improve.  At 24 years of age, Veronika should be enjoying her youth, but instead she feels she has already done everything important in life and what will happen from then on presents a bleak outlook.  She methodically takes an overdose of pills in order to kill herself, but is instead rescued and put in a mental hospital for depression. When she wakes up and realizes that she isn’t dead, she is told that the pills have damaged her heart and she will die within weeks. She tries not to become too involved with other patients. She doesn’t want to experience feelings and look for reasons to live again. She has decided to die and now it will just take longer than she thought it would. 

BUT as quoted in the book: "An awareness of death encourages us to live more intensely." She experiences a revelation and makes a connection with one patient, Eduard, which reverses her death wish. The irony is that her death is eminent, and now living has more meaning for her than ever.  *SPOILER ALERT* There is a twist in the tale that allows her to live. Her psychiatrist is researching new treatments and her case comes just in time to prove his hypothesis. 


In Coelho’s notes on what inspired him to write this novel, I learned that his past experiences as a mental patient played a significant role in understanding depressions and treatments. In fact many of the scenes describing Eduard seem based off Coelho’s own life. 


One part of the story, which I thought provoking, was when Eduard mentioned that his parents put him in the institution to fix his mental state and fit their mold. They didn’t want him to be different (an individual). They thought the treatment would make him more rational and accepted by society. But the fact is that history of his hospitalization is exactly what made him stick out and become different from others. For some faulty reason, in his parents' eyes, being different was terrible. 

Veronika Decides to Die deals with the subject of madness, and readers will see this in various degrees as other characters living in the mental institution are introduced.  This book allows the reader to reevaluate the importance of life, and reflect on Coelho's words “collective madness is called sanity.”  I think this reality illustrates that madness can incite a person to extreme joy or anger.  But when connecting with others, these emotions can be shared, and somehow that connection validates our reason for living.  When you get to a point in life where you wonder “what is the point?” you have to know that things will change with time.  This reminds me of a lyric from a favorite song of mine by Townes Van Zandt, “to live is to fly, both low and high, so shake the dust off of your wings and the sleep out of your eyes.” 

My book club friends visited to watch a film based on this book, and despite minor differences in location, the film closely follows the story.   Starring Sarah Michelle Gellar, as Veronika, the movie is available on Amazon Prime.   When looking for a dish to complement this book’s discussion, we found no food mentioned in the novel.  We did notice that in the film Veronika longs to once more visit her favorite taco stand and have a Guinness beer from an Irish pub.  Everyday things like this we might take for granted.  This book reminds us that it is important to have an awareness of life and treat every day as a miracle.


This month’s children’s book “to read before you grow up” is Five Children and It. It was written by Edith Nesbitt, who was born on August 15, 1858.  Nesbitt is described by her biographer as the “first modern writer for children” combining realistic, contemporary children in a real-world setting, with magical objects.   Five Children and It was published in 1902, the first in a trilogy, and has never gone out of print. It originally came out as a series in “The Strand Magazine,” a monthly periodical published in the United Kingdom that showcased short fiction and general interest articles.
 

My grandson and I listened to this story as an audiobook, using NC Kids Digital Library (free access with a library card) while driving to Memphis, TN.  It is also available online as a print read through Project Gutenberg.  The book was also made into a BBC television series, and can be found on YouTube.

The children in this story are brothers and sisters from London who have been sent to the family’s countryside home in Kent while their parents are away on business.  Under the “supervision” of household servants, they basically are free to run and explore the outdoors.  There are two boys, two girls, and a baby brother a.k.a. The Lamb … he is, of course, “precious.” 

As the story begins, the children are discussing the earth’s round shape, and are in the process of digging to Australia.  I remember, as a child, trying to dig through to China.  I guess the concept of depth is something that kids have trouble realizing.   What they do discover is a Psammead: a prehistoric sand fairy, or as the title of the book states, an “It.”  The children learn that this creature will grant wishes, but the wishes only last a day. 

The book’s introductory chapter is followed by ten wishes, for a total of eleven chapters.  This makes it easy to read each chapter as a separate adventure, and for young readers, this is makes reading a “whole book” less intimidating.  The children wish for a strange assortment of things, such as being beautiful for a day (no one recognizes them), to have wings (they get stranded on top a bell tower at the end of the day), and another to meet real Indians (they nearly get scalped).  The “classic” wish for gold turns out wrong too because the currency of gold coins they receive is out-of-date and not accepted. 

My grandson, Dylan, says this is a good book and that says a lot for a 15-year-old boy.  Five Children and It works great for a family road-trip audio book!  Dylan’s favorite part was when the older brother wished that The Lamb would hurry and grow up, so they wouldn’t have to babysit him.  I think Dylan could relate well to this wish, since he has two younger half-brothers that he has to mind from time to time. Of course this wish was a spontaneous declaration and therefore it was “wasted.” The children had agreed to decide together what to wish for and that didn’t always work out.  When this wish is granted and The Lamb does grow up older than his siblings.  He meets a girl coming down the lane on a bicycle and he wants to go down the road with her to a pub.  The children have to find ways to keep him contained until the end of the day so they won’t lose him when he turns back into a baby. 

This book is a hilarious, adventurous, and interesting read.  It is the kind of book both children and adults will enjoy.

SIDE NOTE:
Next month’s adult read features The English Patient by, Michael Ondaatje.  Join us for coffee and a FREE early morning movie (film version of Ondaatje’s book) at 9:30 a.m. on August 25 in the luxurious Blue Ridge Movie Lounge.  This venue is located at 17 E Second Street West Jefferson.
Following the event, those who wish, will have lunch and discuss the movie and book. 

Visit this link for online discussion and information about The English Patient. 

Saturday, August 4, 2018

We Need Your Help!


Library programming brings the community rich opportunities for learning, entertainment, and builds connections across all age groups. Special events can connect people to other like-minded individuals who share the same passions as them.  It is also a great time to find a new interest, or discover a hidden talent. 

We strive to offer events and programming for teens and adults that fulfill our library’s mission to promote knowledge, reading, and imagination; support and encourage life-long learning; and contribute to the sense of community and the economic well-being of our county.  And we'd really like to know how we can better serve you through library events, while achieving our mission. Email, call, talk to our librarians on the Upper Level, with programming suggestions.  Share your feedback on programs you have attended. 


I love this quote about a library, by John K. Hudgens, long-time New York Times book reviewer. “I do not mean to suggest that our handsome, newly enlarged library is to be a headquarters of busy bookworms, old and young, routinely absorbing knowledge by the hour while birds sing outside and the Mets fight it out for last place in the National League. On the contrary, a good library is a joyful place where the imagination roams free, and life is actively enriched.”

Dates to remember in August: 

 Children’s Programs
·      Friday Frolic every week at 10:30 a.m. for Pre-Kindergarten. 
·      Design a Book Cover • August 22-September 30 • 6th grade or children ages 11-12: Children are invited to design an original book cover based on any book in the Harry Potter series by JK Rowling. The book cover can be designed using any medium but must be drawn/painted/etc. on an entry blank provided by the library and must not be folded. All entries must be original work by the entrant. Entry forms and blanks may be picked up at the youth services desk. One entry per child. 

Teen Programs
·      T for Teen – Gamers Unite! Meet-up at 4:00 p.m. on August 7. Xbox360 and laptops available for teen gaming.
·      Board Game Café is open at 4:00 p.m. on August 14.  Play a variety of board games and enjoy coffee and sweet treats.
·      The Teen Creative Corner meets at 4:00 p.m. on August 21. Join us for a wide range of creative crafts and projects.
·     TLC (Teen Listening Council) is a safe place for teens to talk openly about any subject. Drop in at 4:00 p.m. on August 28.
Adult Programs
·      Book a Librarian • by appointment • Call 336-846-2041 x227 Got a new tablet? Want to learn how to create beautiful cards and flyers on the computer? Or check out e-books from the library? Or sign up for a social media account? Our friendly librarians want to help you achieve your technology goals through free, no prior skills required, one-onone sessions! Call us or drop by our desk on the Upper Level of the library to schedule an appointment.
·      Yoga Club meets in the library’s downstairs meeting room at 5:30 p.m. on Mondays.
·      Drop in for support on your PhD (Projects half-Done) at 10:00 a.m. on August 4.  Find new ways to stay motivated to achieve your goals throughout the year!
·     The Brouhaha Book Club meets at 5:30 p.m. on August 27 in Boondocks Brewery's Taproom. There is no assigned reading for this book club. Come as you are, read what you want, and join our lively discussion of recent reads!
All Ages
·      Come out and have some FUN with Board Game Bonanza, from 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. every Saturday. Visit the Upper Level to play board games with friends and family!
·      Read & Craft meets at 10 a.m.  on August 11. Travel the world with a hook in one hand and a ball of yarn in the other. This month travel to India and make some Lotus Blossom Knit Socks, an Amigurumi Indian Elephant, or a Tropical Delight Afghan.  Instruction available for beginners and project materials are provided.
·      The Community Drum Circle meets at 5:30 p.m. on August 9 and 23.  Join the celebration of drums, while exploring the soul and spirit of music!
·      Mountain Music Slow Jam will meet from 3:00-5:00 p.m. on August 4 and 18 in the downstairs meeting room. Songs are explained as to timing, breaks, etc… and played in slow time.  Designed for beginners, all skill levels are welcome.
·      PBS’S THE GREAT AMERICAN READ Vote: Cast your vote for The Great ARL Read in person or online at www.arlibrary.org/ashe Review: Write and submit a review of one of the Top 100 books.  Attend: Attend The Great American Read events this summer and fall. Write: Sign up to be a literary pen pal and write a letter to a fellow bookworm.
Family Events
·      Safety Day takes place between 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. on August 4, at  Ashe County High School.   Enjoy fire trucks, free bike helmets (while they last), bounce house, climbing wall, and other fun activities. Come by the library booth! 
·      Lansing Twig Mini-Fest  happens between 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. on August 7. (downtown Lansing, across from Lansing Foods. Check out the Literacy Express, get your face painted, play giant Jenga, and enjoy stories with our librarians.