Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Gift Baskets for ALL Occasions!

Ashe County Friends Corner is the best little gift shop around!  Located in the Ashe County Public Library, the Friends Corner has “like new” books and magazines, as well as older vintage books in good condition, at excellent affordable prices.  

The Friends Corner also has gift baskets for all interests and ages.  In the last year, Mary Carol Elmore retired from making gift baskets and passed the torch to a new basket-making team; Regina Ratner and Linda Brinegar.  

The two meet-up at the library each week to create all sorts of beautiful themed baskets for “bookish” gift giving.  They fill baskets with trinkets, toys, small handy items, beautiful novelties, books, music, games, etc. … There is literally something for everyone.  Whenever I need to find a gift for the hard-to-shop-for person, I always have best of luck looking here.  The price is right and gift value is priceless … perfect for bargain shoppers! These basket-makers are dedicated volunteers who love creating unique lovely gifts out of whatever items they can find.  

All proceeds from the Friends Corner, books and basket sales, are used to fund library programming.   Gift baskets are great gifts for any occasion, but especially this weekend with Easter coming!  If you are looking for something personalized, custom baskets can be ordered.  So don’t hesitate to ask for Regina and Linda.  They love the challenge of making specialty baskets.   

Monday, April 10, 2017

Shelby Stephenson, NC Poet Laureate, Visits Ashe County

In recognition of National Poetry Month, Ashe Library has invited Shelby Stephenson, our state poet to visit next weekend. The library would also like to extend that invitation to the community and welcome all to meet the poet at a Potluck Poetry Picnic & Pickin’ Party in the Park. Shelby has a reputation as one of the finest poets of eastern North Carolina, and is also a talented singer / guitarist. The gathering takes place from 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. on Friday, April 21. Shelby has a published collection of poetry surrounding old family recipes, and the idea is to cook up some of these tasty dishes and hear about his family reminisces through stories and poems. Shelby also loves to jam with other musicians, so please bring your instruments with you to help out with the pickin’ and grinnin’.

Author Margaret Maron, wrote about her cousin Shelby in a program for the North Carolina Literary Hall, “He sings country music, but his poetry reminds me of jazz. Give him a word or a phrase—Mason jars, possum, clawhammer banjo, sweetgum balls—and he will launch into a stream-of-consciousness those words evoke, like John Coltrane or Charlie Parker riffing on a familiar tune, circling and circling before homing back in on the basic melody.”

At 10:00 a.m. on Saturday April 22, Ashe Little Theater, an all-volunteers group, will perform a Reader’s Theater of “Maytle’s World” a play written by Shelby, as a poetic memoir of North Carolina’s agricultural heritage and the role of country music in family life, set at the farm in McGee’s Crossroads where Stephenson grew up. This is a free event and will take place at the Backstreet Concert Pavilion (rain location in the library’s meeting room). Following the morning play, Shelby will greet and award the county’s 5th and 6th grade poetry contest winners at a noon reception in the library. 
 
Poet’s brief bio: Shelby was born in 1938 and raised on his family’s farm in Benson, North Carolina. He is a graduate of UNC Chapel Hill and spent some time as a disc jockey at WTVD-TV in Durham, NC and WMPM radio in Smithfield. Throughout his career, he has chaired the English Department at Buies Creek, NC and served as editor of University of North Carolina’s Pembroke Magazine. 

1984's Resistance Message

George Orwell wrote 1984 in 1948, two years before he died. Many who have read his book believe the ideas of this fictional story seem all too real today. With closer examination, Orwell’s book, set in the future, at the time of its birth, can be thought of as somewhat prophetic when considering today’s political arena. Even outside that arena, society seems to reflect the mantras of Orwell’s Oceania, the fictional country where “war is peace,” “freedom is slavery,” and “ignorance is strength.” This confusing concept of doublethink puts me into deep thought, and makes me wonder about how easy it is to manipulate the masses. What do we think preemptive wars really are? War can’t be started to prevent war without being WAR. I find it hard to relate to that paradox. Freedom … we are all basically slaves to currency. With or without work, taxes are a part of life. Paying them is something everyone must do, or so we’re told. In other words, with this example, there are penalties for exercising freedom. Strength coming from ignorance … blind acceptance. Don’t even think about questioning authority! There are many frightening aspects in 1984, such as the constant monitoring of every move, action, and thought by Big Brother, the perpetual wars, and two-minute hates. I certainly can see a similarity between the fictional two-way telescreens and today’s electronic devices: computers, iPads, smartphones, etc. Today’s technology has capabilities to track our whereabouts and social media provides the avenue for exploitation of individual privacy. We are even guilty of policing each other. In retrospect, while reading this book, I remember the rush to interpret our newly appointed first lady’s facial expressions at her husband’s inauguration. Facecrime? Suppose that smile turning quickly into a frown was a glimpse at trouble behind closed doors. I am cautious not to jump to conclusions, yet that look naturally concerned me. There are other things about our current political leader that bother and concern me, from disregard for minority groups to blatant disrespect for women, immigrants, and people with disabilities.



Since our leadership changed hands, I have been troubled by “alternative facts,” exaggerations and even lies coming from Capitol Hill. I am seeing what Orwell meant when he stated, “political language is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable, and to give an appearance of solidarity to pure wind.” Winston Smith, protagonist in 1984 reflects in his diary at the end of this novel, hope lies with the people. “The only way change will occur is if Proles (regular members of the population), openly choose to revolt.”

It was in opposition to the direction our country is headed under its new administration, that my good friend Karen Gross and I chose to join millions of people across our nation, even around the world, in a March for Women. Karen traveled with me to Atlanta for American Library Association’s Mid-Winter Conference on January 21. On the way there we spent time talking about the recent election and our shared worries over its outcome. Our travels to the conference prevented us being able to join our hometown’s March for Women, but we had heard that many “sister marches” were being planned to coincide with the march on our nation’s capital. So as Karen drove, I crocheted pink “pussy-hats” just in case we ran into a “sister” march. Across the country women were planning to wear these hats in solidarity for their rights and to take back control of a word so lewdly and notoriously used by Donald Trump when bragging about taking advantage of women. Upon arriving in Atlanta and checking into our hotel, we set off on foot and headed for ALA’s conference a few blocks away. Sporting our warm, pink “pussycat” hats (I had stitched eyes, nose, and whiskers on them) we soon fell into step with throngs of activists (estimated 60,000 participants) of all ages, nationalities, and gender. Among young and old, black and white, male and female, there were signs of protest and messages promoting civil rights for all, restoration of dignity and integrity, and environmental awareness. “Real News? Fake News? Ask a Librarian!” … “Read, Resist, Librarians are Pissed!” were two of our favorites. We both felt a sense of love and unity for everyone there. US Representative John Lewis spoke at the march reminding us all that “when we see something not right or not fair, we have a moral obligation to do something … we cannot afford to remain silent!” It was an amazing day, and lifted our spirits to be part of this historic event.

After our experience in Atlanta, Karen and I reread Orwell’s grim classic which made news of top sales following the inauguration. I also spent the next month reading Orwell biographies, essays, diaries, and letters. Another Orwell quote, from his essay “Politics and the English Language” inspired us to participate in A Read-in for 21st Century Literacies, held at Watauga Public Library and organized by a local group, Small and Mighty Acts (SAMA). “One ought to recognize,” he wrote, “that the present political chaos is connected with the decay of language, and that one can probably bring about some improvement by starting at the verbal end.” Discussions throughout the week addressed various kinds of literacies and thoughts about books. I firmly believe that the power of collective knowledge and shared stories will unite us … but they need to be heard. Though we all may not agree on everything, we should never stop learning. Staying informed helps to cultivate tolerance and leads us to “Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness.”

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Huskies Read!

Research shows that boys are having trouble reading, and are getting worse at reading. The facts are that boys don’t read as much as girls and this reading gender gap is affecting boys’ performance in school.  No one is quite sure why. Some of the reasons are biological.  Some of the reasons are sociological.
On his Web site, guysread.com, the teacher and author Jon Scieszka writes that boys “don’t feel comfortable exploring the emotions and feelings found in fiction. . . . Boys don’t have enough positive male role models for literacy. Because the majority of adults involved in kids’ reading are women, boys might not see reading as a masculine activity.” 
Brian Hampton, Ashe High School football coach, realized the need for boys to improve on their reading skills and met with school officials last week to organize after-school reading groups for his Huskies and younger boys.  Starting April 5 the high school boys plan to visit a different elementary school every Wednesday to spend some time reading and talking about books with beginning (boy) readers.  For many boys reading is often viewed as a task to be done, rather than something to be enjoyed. Coach Hampton’s vision is that his players will feel good about themselves by helping, and in return boys of both age groups will actively enjoy and discuss stories, develop their listening and concentration skills, and build an appreciation for reading.  While reading on Wednesdays the Huskies will wear their team jerseys, adding significant “coolness” to the sport of reading.  Coach Hampton is also encouraging his players to get county library cards and find out about resources that are available.  The library has scores of databases, access to books on all topics through its state catalog, DVDs, games, and special programs.  Teens are also invited to volunteer at the county library when looking for community service opportunities. 
After the school year ends, the library will continue inspiring reluctant readers with a “Boys Read Club” to help them develop a love for reading and an appreciation for the books, programs, and services of the library.
Dates to remember in April:
The library will be closed on April 14 and 15 for Easter weekend.

 Children’s Programs
  • Baby Bounce meets every Friday at 10:00 a.m. for ages birth to 2 years.  Enjoy stories, rhymes, bounces, and songs with a stay-and-play social time afterwards.
  • Tot Time meets every Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. for ages 2 and 3.  Wiggle, giggle, laugh, sing, and create!  This is a fun-filled time featuring stories, art, and music.
  • Story Time meets every Thursday at 10:30 a.m. for ages 4 and 5.  Join us for ABC adventures with stories, art, and music.
  • Move to the Music is an active engaging time for youth to explore music, movement, and learning. This program is for ages 1-7 and meets on April 7 at 10:30 a.m.  A moving child is a learning child.
  • The Lego Club meets on April  20 at 4:30 p.m. for grades 1-5. Build, create, and make new friends.
Tween Programs
·         Tween Takeover! Gamers Unite! Tween gamers meet at 4:00 p.m. on April 13 for food and fun with friends to play Minecraft, giant games and various board games.

Teen Programs
  • T for Teen, Gamers unite! will meet at 4:00 p.m. on April 4.  Xbox 360 and laptops available for gaming.
  • Teen Art Studio meets at 4:00 p.m. on April 11. Come and create! We provide the supplies and you make the art in this open choice art studio.
  • Board Game Café meets at 4:00 p.m. on April 18.  Come alone or bring a group to enjoy a variety of board games, hot coffee from local brews, and sweet treats.
  • The Teen Advisory Council (TAC) meets at 5:00 p.m. on April 18.  Tell us what you want to see in YOUR library.
  • Teen Craft Club meets at 4:00 p.m. on April 25.  Join us for a Black Out Poetry Slam to celebrate National Poetry Month!
Adult Programs
  • For all your tech troubles, book and appointment with our friendly reference librarians.  Call 336.846.2041 x227
  • Yoga Club meets in the library’s downstairs meeting room at 5:30 p.m. on Mondays.
  • Read Around the World Book Club meets at 5:45 p.m. on April 19.  Take a literary journey to far-flung locales with this monthly book club, focusing on titles set in other countries. Ask for this month’s selection, The Narrow Road to the Deep North, at the circulation desk.
  • The Library Matinee (TBA) will be at 3:00 p.m. on April 8. 
  • Brouhaha Book Club meets at 5:30 p.m. on April 24 in Boondocks Restaurant for “Books, Beer and Bookworm Babble.”  Come and find out what everyone has been reading lately!
 All Ages
  • A family program, Book and a Bite, takes place from 11:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. on April 1. Pick up a recipe, create a craft, and laugh.  Browse our joke and wacky book selections for mealtime fun.
  • Get Crafty and make Quick Knit & Crochet Gifts at 10:00 a.m. on April 8.  Instruction available for beginners and project materials are provided.
  • The Community Drum Circle meets at 5:30 p.m. on April 11 and 25.  Join the celebration of drums, while exploring the soul and spirit of music!
  • Mountain Music Slow Jam will meet from 5:30-7:00 p.m. on April 7 in the downstairs meeting room (after-hours access through side door on lower parking lot) and on April 21 in the park pavilion (behind the library) for a special potluck pick-nic.  Get together with other musicians and jam.  Songs are explained as to timing, breaks, etc… and played in slow time.  Designed for beginners, all skill levels are welcome.

Special Events:

  • Come out and wish Arly the Library Fox a Happy Birthday at 9:30 a.m. on April 11.
  • Kevin Hining, wildlife education specialist, will be back for a special NC Science Festival event.  Come out and discover what animal has a powerful predator deterrent at 4:00 p.m. on April 20.
  • Save the date and join us from 5:00 – 7:00 p.m. on April 21, for Pickin’ & Grinnin’ in the Park with a Potluck Picnic and a Poet.  Bring a dish and join North Carolina Poet Laureate, Shelby Stephenson, in the park behind the library for this special event!
  • Visit the Backstreet Park at 10:00 a.m. on April 22 to see a performance of Shelby Stephenson’s “family play,” Maytle’s World by Ashe Little Theater. 
  • The Friends of Ashe Library will host a reception for 5th & 6th grade poetry contest winners.  Join us for refreshments to honor young, talented poets.
  • Learn about Moonjars, a novel way to teach your child about money at 4:00 p.m. on April 27.  Come out and create your own Moonjar!

Monday, March 27, 2017

Researching the Homework Gap

Nationally, 7 in 10 teachers assign homework that requires internet access. But an estimated five million households with school-age children do not have internet access at home. Students that fall into this “homework gap”—households where internet access is limited or unavailable—lag behind in education and are less competitive in the workforce.

But if you’re a parent with children in North Carolina’s K-12 schools you already know what happens when your children and/or their classmates can’t meaningfully access the internet.

Many of you spend hours each week driving your children to a nearby McDonalds or Starbucks to use their Wi-Fi because internet is not available to your house or it’s too expensive. Or trek to the local library multiple times a week so your kids can use the computers because your digital device is broken, being used by one of your other children, or you don’t have one at home because buying one doesn’t fit in your budget. 



The State of North Carolina wants to help ensure no child in the K-12 schools falls into the homework gap. But to do so, the State needs to know how widespread the homework gap is and potential challenges students face in accessing digital resources.

To identify this data, our partners, the Broadband Infrastructure Office and the Friday Institute, are conducting a survey of North Carolina households with K-12 students. We would like to encourage you to take the survey so policy makers and education stakeholders can design solutions to this issue.

The anonymous, short survey is available in English and Spanish and can be found here K-12 Internet Access at Home Survey (Encuesta de Accessoa Internet K-12 en el Hogar) (or at below link). It remains open until April 30, 2017.

Should you have any questions, concerns, or feedback, you can reach out to the Broadband Infrastructure Office directly at: broadband@nc.gov or (919) 754-6695.


Tuesday, March 7, 2017

My Granddaddy “was” Tom Sawyer



Mark Twain, published his famous book The Adventures of Tom Sawyer in 1876. The novel developed from reflecting on experiences he had growing up and those of a San Francisco fireman, the “real Tom Sawyer.”   Tom Sawyer, the non-fictional character, met Mark in the 1860s, who was then working as a free-lance reporter for San Francisco's Daily Morning Call.   Sawyer, a celebrated hero, was credited with rescuing ninety lives in a terrible fire that consumed a steamer ship off the coast of Baja.  The two spent many nights drinking, gambling, and telling stories about their boyhood adventures.  Mark was so inspired by Tom that he gave the man's name to his most famous boy character.  Other characters in the book: Aunt Polly, Sid, Huckleberry Finn, Becky Thatcher, and Injun Joe were also inspired by friends and family.  Reports note that Mark, himself, spoke often about 'being' Tom Sawyer.  It may be that some of Tom's adventures were things young Twain would have liked to brag on at the moment in time when he actually experienced them, but smart enough to know that he had to stay mum or risk exposing himself and suffering consequences for his behavior.

My granddaddy, Kenneth Hartman, was born in 1921 and grew up along the James and Appomattox Rivers in Hopewell, Virginia.  After listening to his stories and adventures as a boy, I am quite sure that my granddaddy, Mark Twain, or likely the character Tom Sawyer, must have lived parallel lives.  At a recent visit with my granddaddy I asked him about his all-time favorite book and without thinking he immediately said The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.  Although the book was published forty-five years before he was born and probably not read by granddaddy until at least ten years later than that, he admired and related to the character's adventures.  I can certainly agree that my granddaddy “was Tom Sawyer,” and that most likely this character still lives vicariously today in the lives, if not minds, of many young boys.  Granddaddy tells of discovering a cache of whiskey “moonshine” in the woods while out picking blackberries one day.  He described the thrill of riding in a police car to disclose the find and having to duck down in the floorboard for safety, when nearing the contraband's hidden location.  As the youngest child in a large family, granddaddy often had to find ways to entertain himself while the others were busy doing “adult” things.  Living near the water, folks would think nothing about sharing their boats with each other, and granddaddy recalled many times he would hop in a neighbor’s boat to float downstream.  Permission may have been assumed, but I'm sure he took liberties by setting off on his own.  He admits there were things he discovered on those river outings that he would have loved to tell about, but had to keep those secrets for fear of getting into trouble.     Generally, boys are fearless and never consider danger when exploring outdoors, although his mother would have probably grounded him if she knew half of what he got into.  Another story reminded me of Tom Sawyer's successful attempt to pawn his whitewashing duties off on others.  Once when granddaddy was given the job of looking after a relative's baby, he desperately wanted to play a ball game with his friends.  He cleverly assigned his dog Roscoe to babysitting duties by instructing the dog to watch over the little one while he engaged in sport.  Roscoe was well-trained and guarded the crawling baby by barking and keeping it in place on a nearby quilt spread while the boys played.  Like Tom, Granddaddy had a carefree manner and charmed all the girls.  He was voted by his peers for senior superlatives in most all categories... most handsome, most friendly, most likely to succeed, class clown, wittiest, most popular, you name it Granddaddy was center stage. 

I can just imagine my Granddaddy, a lovable jokester, after recalling the adventures he lived as an adult.  When we visited our grandparents as children, I remember how self-sufficient granddaddy was... tending his garden, building anything he wanted in his wood shop, fishing, hunting, working on cars and trucks.  And I remember his sense of humor and how he always made us laugh.  I'm sure Mark Twain's stories played a big part in shaping my granddaddy's personality and I can picture him now curled up in his own hideaway cave reading about Tom and Huck's adventures.
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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer can be considered a literary classic, and at the same time stirs controversy when challenged for racist, casual insults made by its characters.  I experienced negative feelings about this book from parents of my students when I taught junior high language arts at a predominately black school.   What needs to be considered is that Twain wrote his story in vernacular to show how people talked during that time. Granddaddy points out that the language and dialog were authentic for the 1850s and he knew that, even when he first read the book.  I think like all history books there are things in this novel that we can learn about our past and relate to in our present.  As a girl, my childhood adventures might have included some daring escapades, but with this novel I can enjoy “living” Tom's experiences, or more realistically Becky's.  I know it's true, books can transport their readers with no restrictions, no limits, into other minds, other worlds, and many other adventures. 

Monday, February 20, 2017

Ashe Library Hosts a “Day in the District”

The library will host a “Day in the District” open house from 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. on March 4, 2017. As you may know, the state legislature’s appropriations committees will soon begin drafting their 12 annual spending bills to fund the government for the next two years. Local and state elected officials will be visiting to see how our library serves its community.   Providing access to information, literature, and lifelong learning are the fundamental goals of American libraries. This is true now more than ever, and citizens must use their voices to ensure our library legacy remains viable and fully funded.   We invite you to come speak to your elected officials about the importance of state and local funds in maintaining a high level of library service in Ashe County.
 

During the month of February, Ashe Library has been celebrating National Love Your Library Month.  A special reception is planned from 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. on February 24 to thank the community for all the support received in the last year.  At the reception an unveiling of the library’s new MindKare Kiosk is scheduled.  This unit was granted to the library by VAYA Health and will provide free and confidential screenings to pre-assess mental health conditions.  The public location for this kiosk will prompt increased visibility and ease the process of checking in on one’s mental health, making it as easy and accessible as checking in on one’s physical health.  Next time you are in the library, visit the kiosk for quality care through provision of local treatment referrals.

Some of the comments collected this month, from local patrons of all ages, show how much the public library is appreciated:
  • "I love the library because of the wealth of information contained for all age groups. Not only reading material, but education classes are offered or discussions of different subjects are offered."
  • "Wonderful place to be! It's hard to leave!"
  • "Because it takes me places I can't afford to visit."
  • "Excellent facility! Great programs! Friendly librarians!"
  • "It is a safe place. It's friendly. My home away from home."
  • "Friendly staff! And what an important community resource!"
  • "I love you library because you guys help us when we need help." (child)
Save the date for Ashe Library’s Love Your Library Reception (February 24), and Day in the District (March 4).  Anyone can speak up for your libraries—your voice counts!

Dates to remember in March:

 Children’s Programs

  • Baby Bounce meets every Friday at 10:00 a.m. for ages birth to 2 years.  Enjoy stories, rhymes, bounces, and songs with a stay-and-play social time afterwards.
  • Tot Time meets every Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. for ages 2 and 3.  Wiggle, giggle, laugh, sing, and create!  This is a fun-filled time featuring stories, art, and music.
  • Story Time meets every Thursday at 10:30 a.m. for ages 4 and 5.  Join us for ABC adventures with stories, art, and music.
  • Move to the Music is an active engaging time for youth to explore music, movement, and learning. This program is for ages 1-7 and meets on March 3 at 10:30 a.m.  A moving child is a learning child.
  • The Lego Club meets on March 23 at 4:00 p.m. for grades 1-5. Build, create, and make new friends.
Tween Programs
  • ·     Tween Takeover! Gamers Unite! Tween gamers meet at 4:00 p.m. on March 9 for food and fun with friends to play Minecraft, giant games and various board games.

Teen Programs
  • T for Teen, Gamers unite! will meet at 4:00 p.m. on March 7.  Xbox 360 and laptops available for gaming.
  • Teen Art Studio meets at 4:00 p.m. on March 14. Come and create! We provide the supplies and you make the art in this open choice art studio.
  • Board Game Café meets at 4:00 p.m. on March 21.  Come alone or bring a group to enjoy a variety of board games, hot coffee from local brews, and sweet treats.
  • The Teen Advisory Council (TAC) meets at 5:00 p.m. on March 21.  Tell us what you want to see in YOUR library.
  • Teen Craft Club meets at 4:00 p.m. on March 28.  Join us for our monthly art workshop to make origami bookmarks.
Adult Programs
  •  For all your tech troubles, book and appointment with our friendly reference librarians.  Call 336.846.2041 x227
  • Yoga Club meets in the library’s downstairs meeting room at 5:30 p.m. on Mondays.
  • Read Around the World Book Club meets at 5:45 p.m. on March 15.  Take a literary journey to far-flung locales with this monthly book club, focusing on titles set in other countries. Ask for this month’s selection, The Elegance of the Hedgehog, at the circulation desk.
  • The Library Matinee features Loving (PG13) at 1:00 p.m. on March 18.  Watch the story of Richard and Mildred Loving who violate a Virginia law that prohibits interracial marriage and take their case to the Supreme Court.
  • Brouhaha Book Club meets at 5:30 p.m. on March 27 in Boondocks Restaurant for “Books, Beer and Bookworm Babble.”  Come and find out what everyone has been reading lately!
  • Come out for a Pink4Lunch at 12:00 p.m. on March 29 to eat, meet, and educate. In partnership with Susan G. Komen Northwest NC, the library will host a lunch and learn session to raise awareness of importance for the early detection of breast cancer. Registration is encouraged.

 All Ages
  • A family program, Book and a Bite, takes place from 11:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. on March 4. Create a hand puppet, pick up a recipe and browse selected books for dinner table conversation starters.
  • Get Crafty and make Quick Knit & Crochet Gifts at 10:00 a.m. on March 11.  Instruction available for beginners and project materials are provided.
  • The Community Drum Circle meets at 5:30 p.m. on March 14 and 28.  Join the celebration of drums, while exploring the soul and spirit of music!
  • Mountain Music Slow Jam will meet from 5:30-7:00 p.m. on March 3 and 17 in the downstairs meeting room (after-hours access through side door on lower parking lot).  Get together with other musicians and jam.  Songs are explained as to timing, breaks, etc… and played in slow time.  Designed for beginners, all skill levels are welcome.

Special Events:

  • Kevin Hining, NC Wildlife Resources Education Specialist, talks about Citizen Science projects with native wildlife at 4:00 p.m. on March 2.
  • Visit between 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. with our elected officials at the library’s “Day in the District.”
  • Hear young local talent perform a Celtic Music Concert at 4:00 p.m. on March 16.